Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman is a great character full of heroic naivety and innocence, but also obvious fortitude that strays above stereotyping that similar roles have fallen to. Appropriately long to give homage to background material, yet not dragged by irrelevant back story or side ventures, this movie finds its voice and pace with ease.

It’s good to have a female superhero to give some diversity to the boys club genre. Reinforcing this glaring diversification is a sidekick cast outside of the typical pool in terms of both character traits and background. It’s a small note next to Wonder Woman, but yet meaningful and well placed.

WWI provides perhaps the film’s greatest asset, as a mindful backdrop for this origin story, successfully blending the tragic conflict with elements of Wonder Woman’s larger battle with Greek mythology, without resorting to cliché villain mechanics.

DC has finally put together a competent film to compete with the onslaught of great Marvel films. While starting from the incredible position of the Dark Knight trilogy (and even those weren’t universe films), Warner Bros. faltered time and time again with films like Green LanternSuicide Squad, Man of Steel, and Batman vs. Superman. But Wonder Woman puts the comic book rival back on proper grounding, with high hopes for Justice League and the orbiting stand alone hero flicks.  If Wonder Woman becomes the standard benchmark for the DC movies slated in the coming years, Marvel will have a good run for its money.

8.7/10