“Deadpool” is the breath of fresh air that the world has been waiting for in hero films.

“The Dark Knight” revolutionized the superhero film genre by shifting away from the cartoonish, cliché themes of nearly every hero movie before, and instead focusing on a darker human complexity. This dramatically elevated the film’s cinematic appeal, and more importantly, its cash flow (grossing over 1 Billion $$$$$$$$)

Since that 2008 release, we have had a wave of really good super hero flicks trying to imitate that successful formula. Super hero films are just reliable cash cows for film studios. They are almost guaranteed summer blockbusters of good vs. evil, assuming you don’t mess up and make a terrible “X-men Origins: Wolverine” (2009), or an even worse “Green Lantern” film ironically starring Ryan Reynolds (2011).

“Deadpool” is a bold and well made move in the opposite direction of every other super hero film in the past 8 years. Allotting just enough time for scant serious elements, the movie is predominately focused on being crude, raunchy, and extra violent in all the right ways, and providing the perfect anti-hero character. Deadpool is a scumbag, who uses his power to take petty revenge, not saving the world or some other grandiose aim.

By understanding its predictable genre counterparts, “Deadpool” never takes itself too seriously–to its benefit,  and avoids looking weak when it brings in random characters or has an obvious plot point. Ryan Reynolds (Deadpool), who only works well in comedic roles, perfects this quality, something that the “Green Lantern” film tried to accomplish but failed at.

“Deadpool” is a hugely important counter film to the continuously releasing “Avengers” and “Dark Knight” style films out there, and will be far more memorable because of that.

8.8/10