Green Day’s decision to make an album trilogy was based on the different sounds that their songs were unfolding into. “Uno” was considered to be more of the classic Green Day. But “Dos” is what the band had self-declared as a garage band experiment sound. The influence of “Dos” seems like a mesh based in the early rock era’s with instrumental sounds from Jimmy Hendrix and other classic artists.

There seems to be a trending theme throughout the trilogy with the usage of similar phrases or words in songs like “Stop When the Red Lights Flash”, words that appear in “Uno” song “Oh Love”. This is something Green Day did throughout “American Idiot” and “21st Century Breakdown”, and it’s something I personally have come to love from the group.

But the general lyrical pattern in “Dos” is more about lust, craze, and partying. I originally listened to “Stray Heart”, and thought it was more of a cheezy love song. But after watching the music video I realized the song is much more clever than that. “Amy” breaks the stride, as it is a track dedicated to the late Amy Winehouse.

“Dos” keeps the trilogy going with more great instrumentals, with plenty of 60’s sounding guitar solos and striding bass lines. That garage band sound they were going for makes “Dos” sound like a project of the Green Day side project Foxboro Hot Tubs, “Fuck Time” actually being created for that project.

Hardcore Green Day fans will enjoy the different sound that this album adds to the Green Day library, but casual fans might find it too weird of a departure in a few of the songs, particularly the really interesting track “Nightlife”, featuring Lady Cobra. The best song on the album by far is “Lazy Bones”, which blends the classic Green Day into this album the best. Other personal favorites of mine would be “Fuck Time”, “Stray Heart”, “Wild One”,  “Baby Eyes”, which makes a cultural reference to the Arab Spring, and “Makeout Party”. I don’t have much care for the first track “See You Tonight”, which must have a back story, but the rest of the album is an enjoyable experimental departure that most bands don’t have the courage to go to. “Dos” may not be as good as “Uno”, but it’s a great second part to the trilogy as a different sounding piece to the puzzle.

I give it a 8.7 out of 10